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Stefano Lambiase

I was born in Salerno (Italy) on July 9th 1996, and I enrolled in a Computer Science course at the University of Salerno in 2015. During these years, I improved my skills in Programming, Mathematics, Algorithms, and Software Engineering, and I obtained the (magna cum laude) Bachelor's Degree defending a thesis on Test Smell Detection and Suggestions proposed by Prof. Andrea De Lucia. Also, I fell in love with Software Engineering, and I chose to begin a Master's Degree in Computer Science, curriculum Software Engineering and IT Management, at the University of Salerno in 2019. I got the (magna cum laude) Master's Degree on September 30th 2021, defending a thesis regarding the human and social aspects of Software Development and Software Project Management. During the work, I was supervised by Prof. Filomena Ferrucci, Prof. Fabio Palomba, and Dr. Gemma Catolino.

Personal info

Name
Stefano Lambiase
Birthday
09/07/1996
Place of birth
Salerno (SA)
Nationality
Italian

Contact info

E-mail
stefanolambiase7@gmail.com
Institutional E-mail
slambiase@unisa.it

Research Interests

Social and Human Aspects of Software Engineering
Software Project Management

Software Bot

Software Maintenance and Evolution

Résumé

Hobbies & Interests

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Social Media and Web Chair of the Third Workshop on Gender Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion in Software Engineering

Pittsburgh, USA

2022

Member of the GE@ICSE 2022 social media and web chair, an ICSE 2022 workshop about the role, difficulties and opportunities concerning people of different gender in the field of software engineering, in research, education and industry.

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science Start

University of Salerno - Software Engineering Lab (SESA)

1 November, 2019

Started my Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Salerno at the Software Engineering Laboratory (SESA Lab). My doctoral project is titled “Longitudinal Data-Driven Software Project Management” and regards the social and human aspects of Software Development and Management.

Master's Degree in Computer Science

University of Salerno

21 September, 2019 - 30 September, 2021

Obtained the Master's Degree in Computer Science at University of Salerno with a research thesis about Social Aspects of Software Engineering called “Cultural and Geographical Dispersion Impact on Communication and Collaboration of Software Development Teams”.

MaLTeSQuE 2021

Athens, Greece

23 August, 2021

Participated in the MaLTeSQuE 2021 workshop, co-located with ESEC/FSE 2021, with a presentation abstract titled “Evidence and Machine Learning based Task Allocation: A combined Approach”.

App Challenge 2021 - VII Edition Participant

University of Salerno

September, 2020 - February, 2021

Took part in App Challenge 2021 - VII Edition event, powered by the University of Salerno and Comune di Salerno for the Enterprise Mobile Application Development course.
Worked with other two students and followed by three tutors from an external society, on a native mobile app built with:

BiblioNet Project Manager

University of Salerno

30 October, 2020 - 29 January, 2021

In a 3-months exam simulation, I lead a team of 8 students as Project Manager for the development of “BiblioNet”, a web app.

The DARTS Project

SESA Lab, University of Salerno

January, 2019 - July 2020

Submitted a paper titled “Just-In-Time Test Smell Detection and Refactoring: The DART Project”. This paper was published at ICP '20.

Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science

University of Salerno

15 January, 2019 - 30 May, 2019

Obtained the Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science at University of Salerno with a research thesis about Test Smell called “Test Smell Detection and Suggestions (TESEUS)”.

Good Fences Make Good Neighbours? On the Impact of Cultural and Geographical Dispersion on Community Smells

Proceedings of the 44th International Conference on Software Engineering - Software Engineering in Society (ICSE-SEIS 2022)
ICSE-SEIS 2022 Human and Social Aspects
of Software Engineering

Software development is de facto a social activity that often involves people from all places to join forces globally. In such common instances, project managers must face social challenges, e.g., personality conflicts and language barriers, which often amount literally to “culture shock”. In this paper, we seek to analyze and illustrate how cultural and geographical dispersion—that is, how much a community is diverse in terms of its members’ cultural attitudes and geographical collocation—influence the emergence of collaboration and communication problems in open-source communities, a.k.a. community smells, the socio-technical precursors of unforeseen, often nasty organizational conditions amounting collectively to the phenomenon called social debt. We perform an extensive empirical study on cultural characteristics of GitHub developers, and build a regression model relating the two types of dispersion—cultural and geographical—with the emergence of four types of community smells, i.e., Organizational Silo, Lone Wolf, Radio Silence, and Black Cloud. Results indicate that cultural and geographical factors influence collaboration and communication within open-source communities, to an extent which incites—or even more interestingly mitigates, in some cases—community smells, e.g., Lone Wolf, in development teams. Managers can use these findings to address their own organizational structure and tentatively diagnose any nasty phenomena related to the conditions under study.


S. Lambiase, G. Catolino, D. A. Tamburri, A. Serebrenik, F. Palomba, F. Ferrucci

Just-In-Time Test Smell Detection and Refactoring: The DARTS Project

Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Program Comprehension (ICPC)
ICPC 2020 Maintenance

Test smells represent sub-optimal design or implementation solutions applied when developing test cases. Previous research has shown that these smells may decrease both maintainability and effectiveness of tests and, as such, researchers have been devising methods to automatically detect them. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of tools that developers can use within their integrated development environment to identify test smells and refactor them. In this paper, we present DARTS (Detection And Refactoring of Test Smells), an Intellij plug-in which (1) implements a state-of-the-art detection mechanism to detect instances of three test smell types, ie, General Fixture, Eager Test, and Lack of Cohesion of Test Methods, at commit-level and (2) enables their automated refactoring through the integrated APIs provided by Intellij.


S. Lambiase, A. Cupito, F. Pecorelli, A. De Lucia, F. Palomba

Erwin Bot

🤖 Chat bot for management support built with Azure Cloud Services. Produced for the Cloud Computing course of Computer Science at University of Salerno. It offers the manager the opportunity to communicate in an organized manner with the project team and, at the same time, monitor and organize the various activities under development.

BiblioNet

📕 🎓 Spring Boot Web App for library support. Produced for the Software Engineering and Software Project Management courses of Computer Science at University of Salerno.

DARTS

DARTS (Detection And Refactoring of Test Smells) is an Intellij plug-in which (1) implements a state-of-the-art detection mechanism to detect instances of three test smell types, i.e., General Fixture, Eager Test, and Lack of Cohesion of Test Methods, at commit-level and (2) enables their automated refactoring through the integrated APIs provided by Intellij.